Cubop-A-Lula

From ‘Go Bongo’ to ‘Mama Inez 1947’, we have mixed 19 ‘Latin Jazz‘ tunes around the theme of ‘Cuban Influences‘. It has Chico O’Farrill, Charlie Parker & Machito, Candido, James Moody and many more.

LINER NOTES
IMAGE : Photo by Daniel Sandoval
INFORMATIONS

Wikipedia: Cubop, occasionally referred to as “afro-cubop” or “afrobop,” is a type of Afro-Cuban Jazz that mixes Afro-Cuban rhythms with harmonies and musical timbre typical of Bebop. It is among the earliest types of Latin Jazz.

Jazz.com : None is more spectacular than “Manteca,” built on a relentless vamp married to a stately swing bridge. Gillespie plays with unbridled passion; indeed the whole band seems pushed into overdrive by Pozo’s presence

AllAboutJazz : Chano Pozo and Dizzy Gillespie performed at Carnegie Hall on Sept. 29, 1947 showcasing “Cubana Be, Cubana Bop,” with Chano featured on a conga solo, and going into an Abakuá chant. Cubop was born. They would go on to record “Manteca”, which was to be Dizzy’s biggest hit ever.

Latin American Folk Institute : Pianist-composer Antonio Maria Romeu, a white Cuban of French descent, had formed a charanga francesa (strings and flute with the addition of tympani) and “africanized” it with Afro-Cuban musicians and instruments.

milonga.co.uk : Father of the son montuno, unequalled tresero, creater of the conjunto format, it is impossible to overstate the importance of Arsenio Rodríguez. He defined the sound of Cuban music in the 1940s and is both the mother and father of the mambo

Musician Guide : The youngest child in a musical family, Israel López earned the nickname “Cachao” from a family surname, although the term as a variant of the word cachondeo, meaning jokester, also seemed to fit his personality.

LatinJazzClub.com : In 1946, Camero first came to the U.S. with the fiery rumba dance team of Carmen and Rolando. It was with this revue where Camero demonstrated an unheard of technique in his conga drumming was playing a steady rhythm with one hand while improvising with the other.

Space Age Musicmaker : MAchito moved to New York City in 1937, following the lead of his friend (and later, brother-in-law), Mario Bauza. In 1940, they decided to form a group. Their timing was fortuitous, since there a temporary dearth of new songs due to a strike by members of ASCAP (Bauza and Machito were members of the new syndicate, BMI).

Jazz House : Chico O’Farrill found work as an arranger with Benny Goodman, and also wrote the popular “Undercurrent Blues” for the band. He worked as a “ghost” for other arrangers who found themselves overstretched, including Walter Fuller and Quincy Jones.

Jazz House : Chico O’Farrill found work as an arranger with Benny Goodman, and also wrote the popular “Undercurrent Blues” for the band. He worked as a “ghost” for other arrangers who found themselves overstretched, including Walter Fuller and Quincy Jones.

PLAYLIST : Nat King Cole Trio – Go Bongo (3.07) . Miguelito Valdes – No negrita no (2.45) . Chico O’Farrill – El Manisero (2.41) . Stan Kenton & His Orchestra – Cuban Episode (4.47) . Arsenio Rodriguez – Cumbacha (2.26) . Antonio Maria Romeu – Ya Esta El Cafe (3.44) . Machito & His Afro Cuban Orchestra – The Afro-Cuban Jazz Suite (7.28) . Candido – Beautiful (2.54) . Howard McGhee & His Afro Cuboppers – Cubop City (5.32) . Dizzy Gillespie – Manteca (3.09) . Tito Puente – Tanga (3.11) . James Moody – Tin Tin Deo (2.49) . Jack Costanzo and His Afro Cuban Band – Chicken and Rice (2.46) . Charlie Parker & Machito – Mango Mangue (2.57) . Enrique Jorrin – Osiris (3.18) . Nappy Lamare – Mama Inez 1947 (3.19) . Mario Bauza – Quedate (4.02) . Perez Prado – Que rico mambo (2.31) . Chano Pozo – Rumba En Swing (2.37) .

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