Marius Neset – Birds

Birds‘ is a further development of Marius Neset as a performer and bandleader. It is the perfect showcase of his brilliance as an inspirational and inspired composer.

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TRACK LISTING & CREDITS

Track listing1. Birds (Marius Neset) – 10:522. Reprise (Marius Neset) – 3:263. Boxing (Marius Neset) – 7:004. Portuguese Windmill (Marius Neset) – 7:495. Spring Dance (Marius Neset) – 2:296. Fields of Clubs (Marius Neset/Anton Eger) – 5:237. The Place of Welcome (Marius Neset/Anton Eger) – 4:368. Introduction to Sacred Universe (Marius Neset) – 1:459. Sacred Universe (Marius Neset) – 8:2310. Math of Mars (Marius Neset) – 5:0211. Fanfare (Marius Neset) – 5:56PersonnelMarius Neset – SaxophonesIvo Neame – PianoJim Hart – VibesJasper Høiby – Double BassAnton Eger – DrumsAdditional musicians:Ingrid Neset – Flute, Piccolo FluteDaniel Herskedal – TubaBjarke Mogensen – AccordionTobias Wiklund – TrumpetRonny Farsund – TrumpetPeter Jensen – TromboneLasse Mauritzen – French HornProduced by Marius Neset and Anton EgerRecorded by August Wanngren at The Village, Copenhagen, April 2012Mixed by August Wanngren in We Know Music StudiosMastered by Thomas Eberger at Stockholm MasteringAlbum artwork by Darren RumneyLabel Edition Records
(Source Marius Neset | Official Site)[/toggle]

REVIEWS

Herald Scotland
The title track manages to incorporate Norwegian folk, Steve Reich systems music, a cartoon soundtrack, Michael Brecker-esque volcanic saxophone expression and the folk-brass band carousing of France’s l’Occidentale de Fanfare into the service of Neset’s very own exuberant musicality – and that’s just for starters.

Irish Times
Birds is a suite of Neset’s own compositions, full of wit and surprise, impeccably played by an ensemble that includes pianist Ivo Neame and vibraphonist Jim Hart. Echoes of Hermeto Pascoal, Frank Zappa and Neset’s mentor, Django Bates, may be discernible in the writing

The Guardian
A fluent tenor saxophonist, he’s also a composer able to shape-shift between classicism and funky improvisation. This follow-on from 2011’s feted Golden Xplosion ranges freely across styles, using a six-piece brass section, vibes and accordion.

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