Satchmo Loves Company

Louis Armstrong’s exuberant and gravelly voice happened to be the perfect match with the mellifluous or crooning voices of his contemporaries. His blasting trumpet, the perfect contrast with the pianist.

Who ever they were, Billie Holiday, Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Dean Martin, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, Johnny Cash, Marlene Dietrich, Peggy Lee, Earl Hines, Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson and so on

Today “Louis Loves Company” reviews Armstrong most famous “meetings” on film, television and recording.

“Oh when the saints ….”

Track Listing Video : 1.Lonesome Man Blues / Confessin´ . 2.Birth Of The Blues (With Frank Sinatra / Edsel Show 1957) – 03:25 . 3.I’M Glad We’Re Not Young Anymore (With Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Peggy Lee / The Bing Crosby Show) – 03:15 . 4.That’S Jazz (With Bing Crosby / High Society 1956) – 04:35 . 5.Umbrella Man (With Dizzy Gillespie) – 03:01 . 6.A Song Is Born (With Benny Goodman, Danny Kaye, Laurindo De Almeida, Lionel Hampton, Tommy Dorsey And More / A Song Is Born 1948) – 06:27 . 7.When The Saints Go Marching In (With Danny Kaye / The Five Pennies 1960) – 03:05 . 8.The Blues Are Brewin (With Billie Holiday / New Orleans 1947) – 02:10 . 9.New Orleans (With Billie Holiday / New Orleans 1947) – 02:01 . 10.That’S My Desire (With Velma Middleton / Cavalcade Of Bands 1950) – 04:40 . 11.Old Man Time (With Jimmy Durante) – 03:32 . 12.Grassa E Bella (With Roberto Sironi / Quelli Della Domenica / 1968 – 05:27 . 13.Mdeley (With Dean Martin/ 1966) – 05:42 . 14.Battle Royal Scene (Sidney Poitier, Paul Newman / Paris Blues 1961) – 06:03 . 15.Medley(The Johnny Cash Show 1970) – 09:43 . 16.Blue Yodel No. 9 (With Johnny Cash / The Johnny Cash Show 1970) – 05:29 . 17.When It’S Sleepy Time Down South – 02:47 . 18.A Rhapsody In Black And Blue (1932) – 10:04 . 19.High Society (1956) – 03:19 . 20.When The Saints Go Marching In – 04:47

Track Listing : 1.April In Paris (With Ella Fitzgerald) . 2.Makin’ Whoopee (With Oscar Peterson) . 3.The Gypsy (With The Commanders) . 4.That Lucky Old Sun (Just Rolls Around Heaven All Day) (With Gordon Jenkins Orchestra And Choir) . 5.You Rascal You (I’Ll Be Glad When You’Re Dead) (With Louis Jordan & His Tympany Five) . 6.Honey, Do! (With Scoville Browne, George Oldham, Bud Johnson, Teddy Wilson, Etc) . 7.St. James Infirmary (With Jack Teagarden) . 8.Shadrack (With The Lyn Murray Singers) . 9.Weather Bird (With Earl Hines) . 10.Cotton Tail (With Duke Ellington) . 11.Trouble In Mind (With Velma Middleton) . 12.Sweet Georgia Brown (With Freddie Johnson, Arthur Briggs) . 13.Wo Ist Der Mann? (With Marlene Dietrich) . 14.Goodbye To Summer (With Greta Keller) . 15.Doing The Gorgonzola (With Danny Polo & Swing Stars) . 16.I’M Goin’ Huntin’ (With Jimmy Bertrand’S Washboard Wizards) . 17.Pennies From Heaven (With Bing Crosby, Frances Langford, Jimmy Dorsey) . 18.In The Shade Of The Old Apple Tree (With The Mills Brothers) . 19.You Can’T Lose A Broken Heart (With Billie Holiday, Sy Oliver) . 20.Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans? (Eddie Delange, Louis Alter) . 21.Ain’T Misbehavin’ (With Fats Waller, Harry Brooks, Andy Razaf) . 22.What A Wonderful World (With Bob Thiele Jr., George David Weiss, Oliver Nelson)

Louis Loves Company

Not long before his death in July of 1971, Satchmo culminated his career with a record date and birthday party attended by both avant-garde performers, like saxophonist Ornette Coleman, and traditional jazz musicians, like trumpeter Reuben “Ruby” Braff. […]

Star-Studded High Society Features Sinatra, Armstrong & Crosby Armstrong and his band get into the story as house guests of Crosby—the scene is Newport, Rhode Island—and he has invited them to stay with him during their appearance at the jazz festival. Porter did an excellent job in providing two specialty numbers that give Armstrong and his bandsmen opportunity to show to their best advantage. […]

Friday Duet Frank Sinatra and Louis Armstrong At a time when not many people of color appeared on the small or big screen, Sinatra brought on Armstrong and gave him audience to expose his considerable talents to an even larger audience. […]