Streets With A Name

From ‘Fifty-First Street Blues’ to ‘West 42nd Street’ , we have mixed 13 ‘Pure Jazz‘ tunes around the theme of ‘Street Names‘. It has Bill Evans, Sonny Rollins, Jay McShan, Kenny Dorham and many more.

LINER NOTES
IMAGE : Tourists on the Upper West Side Photo by Ed Yourdon
INFORMATIONS

Yusef Lateef: As a virtuoso on a broad spectrum of reed instruments — tenor saxophone, flute, oboe, bamboo flute, shanai, shofar, argol, sarewa, and taiwan koto — Yusef Lateef has introduced delightful new sounds and blends of tone colors to audiences all over the world, and he has incorporated the sounds of many countries into his own music. As a result, he is considered a pioneer in what is known today as “world music.”

Noro Morales @ Music of Puerto Rico : A fitting tribute to Morales was the 1984 album “A Giant Step” by Charlie Palmieri which included the song “Rumba Rhapsody” with piano and rhythm inspired by Morales.

George Lewis : George Lewis never tried to be a virtuoso soloist. He loved to play melodic ensembles where his distinctive clarinet was free to improvise as simply as he desired. When Lewis was inspired and in tune, he could hold his own with any of his contemporaries in New Orleans and he always sounded beautiful playing his “Burgundy Street Blues.” To everyone’s surprise (including himself), he became one of the most popular figures of the New Orleans revival movement of the 1950s.

Martin Denny @ S p a c e A g e P o p M u s i c : The King of the Tiki Hut. Denny not only brought exotica its biggest hit of all time with his #2 single of Les Baxter’s “Quiet Village,”, he gave two other key figures in exotica–Arthur Lyman and Julius Wechter–their starts, and influenced several generations of lounge performers.

Kenny Dorham @ The Hard Bop Homepage : Kenny was a singularly gifted instrumentalist and improvisor who distinguished himself in Bebop but really came into his own during the Hard Bop period when his mature playing graced the Jazz Messengers and the Max Roach Quintet, both quintessential groups of the genre. Kenny was also an excellent jazz composer and a highly proficient arranger. He used to “ghost” many of the charts which were published under the name of Walter “Gil” Fuller. Dorham was a sensitive ballad singer to boot.

Bill Evans : Saxophonist Bill Evans first joined Miles Davis group in 1980 at the age of 22, and went on to record six records and tour the world with Davis numerous times over a four-year period. He then toured and recorded three CDs with John McLaughlin and the Mahavishnu Orchestra, and later played with Herbie Hancock, Lee Ritenour, Dave Grusin, Steps Ahead and Mick Jagger, among others, garnering a few Grammy Awards® along the way. The sax man has been touring almost exclusively with his own band since 1990, playing well over 100 concerts worldwide per year. He has recorded 19 solo CDs, including his latest, Dragonfly, and received two Grammy® nominations for his solo releases, one for Soul Insider (2002) and the other for Soulgrass (2006).

Jay McShan @ Swingmusic.net : In the late 1930s and early 1940s, when Kansas City was a hotbed of jazz activity, Mr. McShann was in the thick of the action. He landed in Kansas City in the 1930s where he found a rowdy town whose lax moral code created an ideal environment for nightclubs and musicians. Along with his fellow pianist and bandleader Count Basie, the singer Joe Turner and many others, he helped establish what came to be known as the Kansas City sound: a brand of jazz rooted in the blues, driven by riffs and marked by a powerful but relaxed rhythmic pulse.

Houston Person : He first became known for a series of albums for Prestige Records in the 1960s. Contrary to popular belief, he was never married to the vocalist Etta Jones, but did spend many years as her musical partner, recording, performing and touring, and for much of his career this association was what he was best known for. They first met playing in organist Johnny Hammond’s band.

Houston Person : He first became known for a series of albums for Prestige Records in the 1960s. Contrary to popular belief, he was never married to the vocalist Etta Jones, but did spend many years as her musical partner, recording, performing and touring, and for much of his career this association was what he was best known for. They first met playing in organist Johnny Hammond’s band.

PLAYLIST : Harry Connick, Jr. – Bourbon Street Parade (4.40) . Bill Evans – Fifty-First Street Blues (5.44) . Sonny Rollins – Grand Street (5.58) . Houston Person – Bleecker Street (3.55) . Jay McShan – Vine Street Boogie (2.34) . Kid Ory & The Creole Jazz Band – Beale Street Blues (5.28) . Chris Barbers Jazzband – St. Phillips Street Breakdown (2.48) . Noro Morales & His Orchestra – 110th street and 5th avenue (2.40) . Martin Denny – On Green Dolphin Street Hernando’s Hideaway (4.41) . Yusef Lateef – 8540 Twelfth Street (4.23) . Lounge Lizards – Incident on south street (3.16) . Kenny Dorham – West 42nd Street (3.44) . George Lewis – Canal street blues (3.13) .

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